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ARTICLE
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 10-14

The effects of birth interval on the birthweights of consecutive, same-sex term siblings


Havana Specialist Hospital, P. O. Box 115, Surulere, and Department of Paediatrics, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
O F Njokanma
Havana Specialist Hospital, P. O. Box 115, Surulere, and Department of Paediatrics, Lagos University Teaching Hospital
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of birth interval on the relationship between the birthweights of successive siblings. METHODS: The records of women who had delivered two consecutive, same-sex, live, singletons babies (1983 through 1997) in a private hospital were analysed. The intervals between the birth dates of the siblings were calculated. The first of the siblings was coded Set A and the second, Set B. The ratios of the birthweights (Set B/Set A) were calculated. Comparison of findings was made between various ranges of birth interval. RESULTS: The birth interval band 24-29 months was associated with the highest mean birthweight for Set B babies and the highest birthweight ratio (p=0.016). Set A babies weighing less than 3000 g were most likely to be outweighed by their Set B siblings (p=0.000001). CONCLUSION: Birth intervals of 24 to 29 months and small size of Set A babies were associated with most significant advantages in birthweight for Set B siblings.


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