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ARTICLE
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 290-295

Intestinal parasitism in Magama Gumau rural village and Jos township in north central Nigeria


Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos. P.M.B. 2084, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
E I Ikeh
Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos. P.M.B. 2084, Jos, Plateau State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in one rural village and one urban centre in North Central Nigeria. METHODS: A total of 111 single stool specimens from all the volunteered rural dwellers and 93 specimens from randomly selected urban dwellers were examined using Formol-ether and modified Ziehl-Neelsen techniques; during the months of June and July 2005. A questionnaire was completed for each subject and the nutritional status of the adults was assessed using the anthropometric measurements (weight and height for age and Biomass index). RESULTS: The results suggest very high prevalence rates of intestinal parasitosis of 72.1% and 69.9% for the rural and urban populations respectively. All the age groups were infected. The males in the rural area had a prevalence of 69.2% as against 74.6% in females (P>0.05); while in the urban area, the males were more significantly infected (77.4%) compared with the females with 66.1% (P< 0.05). Those with normal BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m2) had the highest prevalence of 79.3% and 72.4% for the rural and urban populations respectively. The prevalence of the parasites in the rural and urban populations respectively were: Entamoeba coli (16.2% and 9.7%); E. histolytica (18.9% and 18.3%); E. hartmani (1.8% ad 0.0%); Endolimax nana (16.2% and 18.3%); Iodamoeba butschlii (0.0% and 1.1%); Giardia lamblia (7.2% and 4.3%); Schistosoma mansoni (9.9% and 0.0%); Strongyloides stercoralis (0.9% and 0.0%); Hookworm (4.5% and 5.4%); Ascaris lumbricoides (1.8% and 0.0%); Enterobius vermicularis (0.0% and 1.1%); Cryptosporidium parvum (29.7% and 19.4%); and Enterocytozoon bieneusi/Encephalitozoon intestinalis (39.6% and 47.3%). Polyparasitism was recorded in 48.6% of the rural subjects and 36.6% of the urban subjects. CONCLUSION: The study has shown a very high prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in both the rural and urban populations and that C. parvum and E. bieneusi/E. intestinalis are harboured by apparently healthy individuals.


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