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ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 218-224

Compliance with driver's license laws and illegal licensing among commercial bus drivers in Lagos, Nigeria: Policy implications and evidence for action


1 Department of Community Health & Primary Care, College of Medicine, Idi-Araba, P.M.B. 12003, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Community Health & Primary Care, College of Medicine; Department of Community Health, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba, P.M.B. 12003, Lagos, Nigeria
3 Leverage Consulting Ltd, Road 425, Zone 6, Abuja, Nigeria
4 Department of Community Health, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba, P.M.B. 12003, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Ifeoma P Okafor
Department of Community Health & Primary Care, College of Medicine, Idi-Araba, P.M.B. 12003, Lagos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Aims and Objectives: To determine the level of compliance with driver's license laws among commercial bus drivers in Lagos, Nigeria. Subjects, Materials and Methods: Two intercity motor parks were selected by simple random sampling and all consenting minibus drivers participated in the study. Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) were also conducted with selected officials in the driver training and licensing authorities. Results: Compliance with the minimum age for driving was high (93.6%), so also was having driving test prior to driver's license procurement (83.3%). Formal driver training and VA testing were very low, (26.1% and 32.9% respectively) Overall, only 9.3% of them were found to have fulfilled all the pre-license obligations before obtaining their first driver's license. The odds of a driver with a secondary education having formal driver training is 3.33 times higher than those with no education (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.01-11.35). Drivers who were 60 years or older were 3.62 times more likely to be compliant than those who were between 20-29 years (OR 3.62, 95% CI 0.56-29.19). For the 98.3% of them who possessed valid licenses, 52.3% of them obtained them illegally. All the key officials saw RTIs as a serious public health problem but faced several challenges in the course of their work. Conclusion:Overall compliance with pre-license regulations was very poor. There is need for a review and strict enforcement of driver's license laws to improve compliance. Also vital are fostering inter-sectoral collaboration and improvement in the operations of all establishments involved in driver training and license procurement in Nigeria.


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