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CASE SERIES REPORT
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 233-236

Spectrum of second primary malignant neoplasms in central india: case series from a tertiary care centre


1 From the Department of Surgical Oncology, Sri Aurobindo Medical College and PG Institute, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India
2 From the Department of Pathology, Sri Aurobindo Medical College and PG Institute, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Suvadip Chakrabarti
From the Department of Surgical Oncology, Sri Aurobindo Medical College and PG Institute, Indore, Madhya Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1117-1936.173975

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Background: Cancer survivors are at an increased risk for developing second cancers than the general population. In recent times detection of a new second primary following the index primary has increased due to refinement of existing diagnostic tools and development of newer modalities of diagnosis combined with better understanding of patterns of inheritance, risk factors and environmental influences. Today with improvement in Cancer management the average lifespan of cancer survivors have increased along with the increase in detection of both synchronous and metachronous malignancy with increase in disease free survival. With the improved cancer survival, second primary malignancy has become an important issue among cancer survivors and an increased burden on the treating oncologists and health care system. Aims and Objective: To report the trends of second malignancy in a tertiary care centre in Central India with review of relevant literature. Methods: A hospital based retrospective collection of data of patients diagnosed with second primary malignancy based on Warren and Gates Criteria (1932) over 2 years in the Department of Surgical Oncology of a tertiary care centre in Central India. Conclusion: Secondary primary malignancy needs to be separated from metastasis as the latter implies progression in disease and portends poor survival. Operable synchronous secondary primary malignancy can be tackled in the same sitting thereby reducing the load on the overburdened healthcare system in India. Increase in awareness of secondary primary malignancy leads to better chances of detection management and hence chances of improved survival.


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