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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 54-58

Feasibility study of prospective audit, intervention and feedback as an antimicrobial stewardship strategy at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital


1 Department of Community Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
3 Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Alero Ann Roberts
Department of Community Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/npmj.npmj_115_19

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Background: Antimicrobial resistance, a global problem, is mostly a consequence of misuse or overuse of antimicrobials. This study sought to audit the compliance to hospital antimicrobial policy and determine the ability of medical students to carry out audits. Methodology: This was a retrospective study to determine compliance with departmental policies in the preceding 2 months in the Children's Emergency Room (ChER) using a checklist. The primary outcome was to determine the rational use of antibiotics. The secondary outcomes were to determine whether the de-escalation of antibiotic, change from intravenous to oral or change in prescriptions were performed in line with culture results based on the departmental policy. Results: The records of 450 children who attended ChER of Lagos University Teaching Hospital in January and February 2018 were retrieved for this study, of which 279 (62.0%) were prescribed antimicrobials. A suspected or confirmed diagnosis of infection was made in 214 (76.6%) of the patients, significantly highest in the infant age group (P = 0.03). Cultures were taken from 94 patients (33.7%), and although not statistically significant, cultures were mostly taken from neonatal patients aged <28 days (20/49, 40.8%). Applying the criteria, compliance with departmental guidelines was found in 111 (39.8%) of the cases. Conclusion: We found that the use of antimicrobials was judged unnecessary in 17.2% of the patients seen in ChER. There was a poor practice of collecting samples for culture before prescribing antibiotics. Prospective audit and feedback is feasible and it can be done with medical students who will report their findings to consultants and other doctors knowledgeable in principles of antimicrobial therapy.


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