Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 205
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 316-319

Achalasia of the oesophagus in infancy: a case report


Department of Radiation Biology, Radiotherapy, Radiodiagnosis & Radiography College of Medicine, University of Lagos. Idi-Araba

Correspondence Address:
R A Arogundade
Department of Radiation Biology, Radiotherapy, Radiodiagnosis & Radiography College of Medicine, University of Lagos. Idi-Araba

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

BACKGROUND: Achalasia characteristically causes dismotility of the lower oesophageal sphincter and defective peristalsis of the body of the oesophagus, in response to the act of swallowing, as a result of ganglionic cells degeneration. The resultant oesophageal dilatation leads to food stasis and may cause oesophagitis and tracheobronchial aspiration. Achalasia is a rare occurrence in the paediatric age group and even more extremely rare in the neonate and young infant. Urgent radiologic evaluation of the underlying cause of persistent on-going vomiting in an infant is mandatory. OBJECTIVE: To emphasize the role of upper gastrointestinal imaging in infants with persistent on-going vomiting, severe dehydration and malnutrition through case illustration of a 9-month-old infant seen in a private medical outfit in Lagos. METHODS: Dilute barium oesophagogram, pre- and postoperatively, was performed in a 9-month-old infant and illustrative images were presented. Literature materials on achalasia of the oesophagus were reviewed and juxtaposed with findings in the illustrated case for discussion. RESULTS: Only 3 to 4 percent of achalasia is reported to occur in the paediatric age group with average duration of 28 months from onset of symptoms to diagnosis. Persistent vomiting and failure to thrive are common. Pneumatic dilatations and surgical myotomy are recommended treatment methods. CONCLUSION: Urgent upper gastrointestinal contrast study is appropriate in infants with suspected achalasia for successful management.


[PDF Not available]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed522    
    Printed9    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal