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ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 93-99

A four-year retrospective review of very low birth weight babies seen at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria


Department of Paediatrics, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
R Onalo
Department of Paediatrics, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Aims and Objectives: To review the outcome of very low birthweight infants admitted into the Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU) of University of Abuja Teaching Hospital (UATH), Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of very low birthweight (VLBW) babies seen at the SCBU of UATH over a 4-year period from April 2006 to March 2010, was undertaken. Data were obtained from patients' folders and analyzed. Results: Overall survival was 60.8%. Survival of infants with birth weight below 1000 grams was 26.8% compared to 66.4% for those between 1000 and 1499 grams. The main determinants of survival were birth weight (p<0.0001) and gestational age (p = 0.0106). Other predictors of outcome were development of features of respiratory distress syndrome within hours of delivery, recurrent apnoea, drainage of liquor of more than 18 hours before delivery, hyperkalaemia, lack of antenatal care and being born-before-arrival (outborn). Conclusions: Survival rate is low compared to values from other communities in developing countries but better than values from many centres in Nigeria. Timely and effective management of apnoea, respiratory distress syndrome and prevention of extremely low birthweight (ELBW) deliveries through adequate antenatal care are required to improve on the current survival rate.


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