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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 209-214

At-birth vaccination timeliness: An analysis of inborns in the highlands of Jos, North-Central Nigeria


1 Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Jos/ Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases Unit, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Jos/ Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. S David Danjuma
Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Jos, P.M.B., 2075, Jos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/npmj.npmj_44_20

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Introduction: Immunisation and vaccination programmes are preventive and cost-effective child health interventions for reducing childhood mortality and disability from infectious diseases. Timely administration of these vaccines is important to ensure their effectiveness in disease prevention. Aim: The aim was to determine the timeliness, barriers and predictors of at-birth vaccinations. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 355 mother–newborn pairs using simple random sampling technique by balloting. SPSS version 23.0 was used for data analysis. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were used as point estimates in the binary logistic regression model, while 95% confidence interval (CI) was used as the interval estimate. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant for the study. Results: The mean age of the mothers was 31.0 ± 6 years. The median age of newborns at vaccination was 18 h (IQR = 1 - 17) h. About 185 (52.1%) of the newborns studied were males. Only 191 (53.8%) newborns received at-birth vaccination within 24 h of life. Weekend delivery, birth outside vaccination days, delivery during public holidays and vaccine stock-outs were barriers to timely vaccinations. Private hospital delivery was an independent predictor of delayed at-birth vaccinations (AOR = 2.616; 95% CI = 1.382–4.951). Conclusions: Our study has identified weekend delivery, preterm birth, delivery outside vaccination days and vaccines stock-outs as barriers to timely at-birth vaccinations. Private hospital delivery is a significant predictor of delayed at-birth vaccinations.


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